April is Stress Awareness Month

Being aware of our stress levels is incredibly important.  The older we get the more we are susceptible to its’ effects on us.

The observance of Stress Awareness Month every April started in 1992 to increase the causes and how to decrease stress in our modern world.

There are different types of stress

  • Acute (short term – tests, hassles)
  • Chronic (severe and enduring – often caused by life events)

Both types cause a diminished immune system, increased cortisol and adrenalin in varying amounts.

What we do know is that our neurotransmitters and cortisol talk to other organs and systems inside our body – and the effect of repeat activation leads to low immune outcomes in the cells, blood and vital organs.

We cannot avoid stress…

Life does and will always cause stressful situations.

However, practicing Laughter Yoga regularly decreases the negative effects of stress on your body which is the root cause of many illnesses.

In fact Laughter Yoga is a single exercise that deals with physical, mental and emotional stress simultaneously.

How does it do this?

Through simulated laughter and yogic breathing exercises.  Calming and lowering the cortisol levels and body into a state of relaxing and coping with situations.

*A randomised control trial showed potentially that Laughter Yoga produced a buffer to the endocrine stress response.  So this exercise being used to cope with challenges is perfect.

Adding Laughter Yoga to your well-being toolkit will equip your body to deal with acute stress and ongoing stress which contributes to illness.

Being aware of muscle tension, irritable mood, over/under eating/alcohol consumption, low libido, lack of sleep, depression and anxiety, are just some of the ways stress shows up.

Look after yourself.  Treat yourself well and practice Laughter Yoga to help melt your stress.

For more information on Laughter Yoga sessions, happiness workshops
and Bollywood Laughter Yoga Dance
contact Sara Kay – happy@seriouslaughter.co.uk
or call 07974 778091

*See the trial https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32393092/